LS Programme Term 3

2 May 2017         Speculation and Meaning in the 1980s Swedish Art World: The Making, Display, and Dispersal of the Financier Fredrik Roos’ Art Collection                                    Jenny Sjoholm

9 May 2017           Etched in Bone Screening                                                                        Martin Thomas (Australian National University), discussant: Luciana Martins (The session will start at 2pm and finish around 4.30pm)

16 May 2017         Writing for the Broader Public                                                                     Emily Brown (The Conversation), Sasha Engelmann, Fraser Macdonald (University of Edinburgh), Oli Mould

23 May 2017      Convening Conference Sessions and Editing Special Issues
Sarah Evans, RGS Conference Officer

30 May 2017        Yr1 Presentations

31 May 2017       CGH event: Digital GeoHumanities: Digital Maps, Scale and Digital Film-making                                                                                                                    Co-convened by Harriet Hawkins, Ella Harris and Mike Duggan

10 days that changed geography

128 Piccadilly, home of the Lyceum Club. Taken from "Wonderful London", edited by St. John Adcock (1927–28).

128 Piccadilly, home of the Lyceum Club. Taken from “Wonderful London”, edited by St. John Adcock (1927–28).

For the last ten years I’ve gradually been piecing together the story of ten days in the history of British geography—between the inauguration (on 13 November 1912) of the Geographical Circle of the women-only Lyceum Club and the balloting of the fellowship of the Royal Geographical Society, on 20 November, on the question of women’s entry. The results of this work, drawing on contemporary press coverage and archival sources, have recently been published in The Professional Geographer as part of a special focus section on “Gender and the Histories of Geography”.

I first became aware of the Geographical Circle during my PhD research on the American geographer Ellen Churchill Semple, whose visit to the Lyceum Club in 1912 coincided with the Circle’s inauguration. Among Semple’s papers I encountered a menu card from the luncheon held by the Circle in her honour. It was, I subsequently discovered, one of the very few surviving material traces of the Circle’s existence. Notwithstanding the fact that the Circle was arguably the leading forum for women travellers and geographers during the Edwardian era, it has remained almost entirely invisible in histories of the disciple. The Circle hasn’t so much been written out of the history of British geography; it’s simply never been written in. My paper (the abstract of which follows) is an attempt to rectify that omission.

“A Royal Geographical Society for ladies”: the Lyceum Club and women’s geographical frontiers in Edwardian London

This article reconstructs the history, organization, and campaigning function of the Geographical Circle of the Lyceum Club—a membership group that, under the leadership of Bessie Pullen-Burry (1858–1937), sought to promote and legitimize women’s geographical work in early twentieth-century Britain. Through an examination of archival material and contemporary press coverage, I document the Geographical Circle’s efforts to establish itself as a professional body for women geographers and to lobby for their admission to the Royal Geographical Society. Although considerable scholarly attention has been paid to women geographers’ individual contributions to the discipline, their cooperative, professionalizing endeavors have been comparatively neglected. In tracing the parallel history of the Circle as an example of women’s self-organization, and of Pullen-Burry as an independent campaigner, I argue that a nuanced account of women’s professionalization in geography demands attention to both individual and collective endeavors.

Innes M. Keighren

Introducing the editors…

Photography: Adam Badger

The blog’s current editors are Katy and Huw, both first year PhD students and members of the Social, Cultural and Historical Geography Research Group at Royal Holloway University of London. We are delighted to take over this role to continue the exciting dialogue generated in this research group, which happens at our bi-weekly ‘Landscape Surgery’ meetings, as well as in publication, through public events and academic conferences, interdisciplinary workshops and dialogue with other institutions. We always welcome content from the ‘surgeons’ on their topical research interests, upcoming events, general PhD, post-doc and career advice; and all things Geography (and beyond!) We also welcome guest posts, so if you have anything you’d like to submit, please get in contact with us at huw.rowlands.2014@live.rhul.ac.uk or katy.lawn.2015@live.rhul.ac.uk.

Katy is a first year ESRC-funded PhD student whose work focuses on the changing nature of workspaces/places through a consideration of cultural products and artistic responses to the experience of paid labour. When she is not editing blog posts or reading Peter Fleming, Katy also helps with Royal Holloway’s student-run film and debate society, Passengerfilms and reads/experiments with creative research methods and poetic ethnography.

Huw is a first year AHRC-funded PhD student whose research focuses on re-performances of first-contact encounters in a colonial-indigenous context. A ‘Surgeon’ since undertaking an MA in the department 2014-15, Huw particularly enjoys the interdisciplinary nature of surgeries. When not studying, he is also a (very) part-time project manager at the British Library. Other activities include photography, drawing, theatre, world music, badminton and avoiding cats.

AAG Dry Run: Miriam Burke, Pip Thornton and Simon Cook

17204138_10155050018541948_275600179_nOn a (finally slightly more spring-than-winter-like!) afternoon, the Landscape Surgery group gathered at Bedford Square to hear early versions of some of the papers being presented by group members at this year’s AAG Annual Meeting in Boston. We heard from Miriam Burke and Pip Thornton (pictured left), who delivered fascinating material; whilst Simon Cook, who was unfortunately unable to make the session, offered his apologies, but also had some fascinating material to share.

Miriam, Pip and Simon are also convening sessions at the AAG – below are both the summaries of their papers, and the description of the sessions they are convening.

 

Miriam Burke

Paper Title: Threads, ties and tangles: exploring the idea of ‘more than human’ social reproduction as a means to cultivate caring practices for the climate using participatory art practices

Abstract: In their ‘feminist project for belonging in the anthropocene’ Continue reading

The Second Annual Denis Cosgrove Lecture: Dee Heddon

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Photo: Ed Brookes

Walking Aesthetics and Performing Landscape

by Ed Brookes

The second annual Dennis Cosgrove lecture was presented by artist and researcher Dee Heddon. Dee is professor of contemporary performance at the university of Glasgow, and author of several publications including ‘Autobiography and Performance’ (2008) and co-editor of a new book series for Palgrave on ‘performing landscapes’. Her talk entitled ‘Walking Aesthetics and Performing Landscape’ invited us to explore Continue reading

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‘A Smaller Audience than the Kardashians’: social media for academics with Prof Stuart Elden and Dr Mark Carrigan

both2 The Landscape Surgery group was pleased to welcome Professor Stuart Elden (Professor of Political Theory and Geography at the University of Warwick, and founder of the Progressive Geographies blog) and Dr Mark Carrigan (digital Sociologist, social media consultant and author of the recently published book Social Media for Academics).

The aim of the session was to share knowledge about how to productively use social media platforms in an academic context – even though none of us will (probably) ever have a social media audience as big as the Kardashians, as our speakers pointed out.

Academic Blogging
Stuart shared some advice from his own personal experience of blogging…

1) Be Useful to Yourself
What is the blog for? How will it be helpful for you? The primary goal should always be that blogging is something that is useful to you as a researcher: whether this is a way of thinking things through, sharing ideas and thoughts, or a way to connect to a wider research community. For Stuart, Progressive Geographies started out as a kind of public notebook or digital archive – a way to keep track of the research process and thoughts. Some academics also say that it helps with writers block – the practice of just writing something can spark off new ideas and perspectives and get the creative juices flowing! Continue reading

Superdiversity: Picturing Finsbury Park

A Research Exhibition by Katherine Stansfeld

Furtherfield Gallery, Finsbury Park 18th February to 1st March 2017

dscf8526Ruth Catlow, co-founder and director of Furtherfield introduced the perfectly-formed group of visitors to the impact that both Katherine’s “informal residency” and this exhibition has had. The show was open to the public for the first time last weekend. More than 300 people visited over the weekend, and 80% were first time visitors. As a way of engaging with the local community, Continue reading

Speculative Emblematics: a philosophical approach to emblem studies

by Lucy Mercer

emblema-6

Embema 6 from

Emblema 6 from Sebastián de Covarrubias y Orozco’s Emblemas morales (1610), displaying a woodcut emblem, a Latin motto and a verse explanation in Spanish (St Andrews copy at r17 PQ6398.H78). St Andrews Special Collections in illustrations, Rare Book Collection.  This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

My research so far is attempting to pioneer ‘Speculative Emblematics’, a philosophical approach to emblem studies. This idea of Speculative Emblematics relies on the leverage of the ‘protean structural fluidity’ of the emblem form. It’s a take on ‘applied emblematics’ – whereby emblems are translated into coins, ornamental friezes and woodwork for example. Instead of transposing emblems onto objects, Speculative Emblematics overlays contemporary philosophy, theory and culture as an additional layer on the pre-existing mosaic of the emblem. Or as another way of explanation, just as in his Critique of Ideology Slavoj Zizek attempts to read the ‘discredited’ theories against one another, in Speculative Emblematics odd or questionable speculative philosophies (object oriented ontology, the work of Franz Brentano and Carl Jung, Graham Harman and Quentin Meillassoux) are read against the bizarre and somewhat discredited form of Renaissance emblems and emblem studies. Continue reading

Royal Holloway’s AAG Participants 2017

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USS Constitution in Boston – “Old Ironside” Image Credit/Source

Royal Holloway University of London Geography Department AAG Participants 2017

The preliminary programme for AAG is now out and the following are links for you to see who from the department is doing what!

Adey, Peter – Royal Holloway, University of London

Sessions:

Authors Meet Critics: Life in the Age of Drone Warfare — Discussant
Exploring the Modular, Material and Performative Politics of Security (3) — Panelist

Brickell, Katherine – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Feminist Geolegalities

Sessions:

Feminist Political Geographies 5: Resistance and Social Movements — Presenter
The makeshifts of evictions, occupations and resistance — Panelist

Burke, Miriam – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Threads, ties and tangles: exploring the idea of ‘more than human’ social reproduction as a means to cultivate caring practices for the climate using participatory art practices.

Sessions:

Feminist approaches to a changing climate — Organizer, Presenter

Cook, Simon – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Stopping on the move: tales from the run-commute

Sessions:

Mobile bodies, technologies and methods: critical perspectives — Discussant
Mobile dwelling 1: Labouring — Presenter

Crawford, Daniel – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Apophatic Geographies

Sessions:

Into the Void III: Supernatural — Presenter

Dodds, Klaus – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Dredging up the volume: China, earthly engineering and the projection of geopower in the South China Sea

Sessions:

(Extra)territoriality Part I: Occupation, disputed territory, and geopolitics — Presenter
Colin Flint’s “Geopolitical Constructs The Mulberry Harbours, World War II, and the Making of a Militarized Transatlantic” Panel Discussion — Panelist

Duggan, Mike – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Tuning a sense of place 

Sessions:

Mobile dwelling 3: Spacing — Presenter

Hawkins, Harriet – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Four Voids

Sessions:

Feminist approaches to a changing climate — Chair
Into the Void V: Disintegrated — Presenter
Mary Gilmartin’s “Ireland and migration in the twenty-first century”-Panel Discussion — Chair, Organizer
Sense as a field’s experience in geography of arts: methods and tools, positionality and teaching — Discussant
Zine stations: craft & play your way through AAG — Chair, Organizer

Mould, Oli – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: The Seven Ethics of Urban Subversion

Sessions:

Emancipatory Horizons of an Urban Century: Interrupting the Anthropo-Obscene — Presenter
How to think about cities? — Panelist
Protest Camps: Politics of Care and Social Reproduction in contemporary social movement politics — Panelist

Robinson, Nicholas – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: How to Backup your Nation-State in a Digital Era: The Estonian Data Embassy

Sessions:

Curating (in)security: Unsettling Geographies of Cyberspace (1) — Presenter

Simon, David – Royal Holloway, University Of London

Sessions:

Can African urbanism break cycles of disaster risk accumulation? — Panelist
CITY Panel II: Capitalisation and Materiality: post-colonial thought and urban-rural revolts — Panelist
The adaptation-development nexus: megacity transitions from resilience to transformation — Discussant

Stansfeld, Katherine – Royal Holloway

Abstract: The limits of place? Boundaries and multiplicity in north-east London

Sessions:

More than lines on a map? Rethinking neighborhoods and regions — Presenter

Thornton, Pip – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: a critique of linguistic capitalism (and an artistic intervention)

Sessions:

Author doesn’t meet the critics: Gilbert Simondon’s On the Mode of Existence of Technical Objects — Panelist
Curating (in)security: Unsettling Geographies of Cyberspace (1) — Organizer
Curating (in)security: Unsettling Geographies of Cyberspace (2) — Organizer, Presenter