Category Archives: Conferences

Notes on a Conference: RHUL Geographers at the RGS-IBG Postgraduate Midterm Conference 2017

As a first-time conference go-er, I was admittedly pretty nervous when I jumped on the train to Cardiff. Holding my prompt cards in one hand and my phone in the other, I found myself running through Paddington station at 9am with my (two!) backpacks, voice-recording my slightly-out-of-breath self reciting my presentation in preparation for the conference. This was not the picture of serenity I had hoped I would embody, but it did (and still does) make for quite an amusing listening experience.

In hindsight, I wish I’d have been able to relax a little more. Because the first thing to say about the RGS PG Midterm conference, is that it is very friendly; and very supportive. People had said this to me before, Continue reading

Royal Holloway’s AAG Participants 2017

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USS Constitution in Boston – “Old Ironside” Image Credit/Source

Royal Holloway University of London Geography Department AAG Participants 2017

The preliminary programme for AAG is now out and the following are links for you to see who from the department is doing what!

Adey, Peter – Royal Holloway, University of London

Sessions:

Authors Meet Critics: Life in the Age of Drone Warfare — Discussant
Exploring the Modular, Material and Performative Politics of Security (3) — Panelist

Brickell, Katherine – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Feminist Geolegalities

Sessions:

Feminist Political Geographies 5: Resistance and Social Movements — Presenter
The makeshifts of evictions, occupations and resistance — Panelist

Burke, Miriam – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Threads, ties and tangles: exploring the idea of ‘more than human’ social reproduction as a means to cultivate caring practices for the climate using participatory art practices.

Sessions:

Feminist approaches to a changing climate — Organizer, Presenter

Cook, Simon – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Stopping on the move: tales from the run-commute

Sessions:

Mobile bodies, technologies and methods: critical perspectives — Discussant
Mobile dwelling 1: Labouring — Presenter

Crawford, Daniel – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Apophatic Geographies

Sessions:

Into the Void III: Supernatural — Presenter

Dodds, Klaus – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Dredging up the volume: China, earthly engineering and the projection of geopower in the South China Sea

Sessions:

(Extra)territoriality Part I: Occupation, disputed territory, and geopolitics — Presenter
Colin Flint’s “Geopolitical Constructs The Mulberry Harbours, World War II, and the Making of a Militarized Transatlantic” Panel Discussion — Panelist

Duggan, Mike – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Tuning a sense of place 

Sessions:

Mobile dwelling 3: Spacing — Presenter

Hawkins, Harriet – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: Four Voids

Sessions:

Feminist approaches to a changing climate — Chair
Into the Void V: Disintegrated — Presenter
Mary Gilmartin’s “Ireland and migration in the twenty-first century”-Panel Discussion — Chair, Organizer
Sense as a field’s experience in geography of arts: methods and tools, positionality and teaching — Discussant
Zine stations: craft & play your way through AAG — Chair, Organizer

Mould, Oli – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: The Seven Ethics of Urban Subversion

Sessions:

Emancipatory Horizons of an Urban Century: Interrupting the Anthropo-Obscene — Presenter
How to think about cities? — Panelist
Protest Camps: Politics of Care and Social Reproduction in contemporary social movement politics — Panelist

Robinson, Nicholas – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: How to Backup your Nation-State in a Digital Era: The Estonian Data Embassy

Sessions:

Curating (in)security: Unsettling Geographies of Cyberspace (1) — Presenter

Simon, David – Royal Holloway, University Of London

Sessions:

Can African urbanism break cycles of disaster risk accumulation? — Panelist
CITY Panel II: Capitalisation and Materiality: post-colonial thought and urban-rural revolts — Panelist
The adaptation-development nexus: megacity transitions from resilience to transformation — Discussant

Stansfeld, Katherine – Royal Holloway

Abstract: The limits of place? Boundaries and multiplicity in north-east London

Sessions:

More than lines on a map? Rethinking neighborhoods and regions — Presenter

Thornton, Pip – Royal Holloway, University of London

Abstract: a critique of linguistic capitalism (and an artistic intervention)

Sessions:

Author doesn’t meet the critics: Gilbert Simondon’s On the Mode of Existence of Technical Objects — Panelist
Curating (in)security: Unsettling Geographies of Cyberspace (1) — Organizer
Curating (in)security: Unsettling Geographies of Cyberspace (2) — Organizer, Presenter

CFP: Labour and life: changing geographies of the workplace

Call for Papers for the Royal Geographical Society with Institute of British Geographers Annual International Conference, 29 Aug – 1 Sep 2017, London, UK.

Session sponsored by the Economic Geography Research Group.
 
Labour and life: changing geographies of the workplace
 
This session will reflect on changes to capitalist work, its spatial constitution, and the consequent relations between labour and life. Classic accounts of the capitalist labour process emphasised disciplinary power, exercised through workplaces bounded in time and space, and producing a degradation of both work and workers (Braverman 1974; Wright 2006). Today, organisational theorists emphasise a capitalist ‘biocracy’ in which a range of life abilities are ‘put to work’ through the blurring of boundaries between work and non-work spaces, times and identities (Fleming 2014; Gregg 2011). Far from heralding a new halcyon era of creative labour, for some these developments have gone hand in hand with growing precarity, intensified labour exploitation and a suffocating ideology of work.
 
These arguments over changing relations between labour and life need critical engagement. In particular, geographical scholarship usefully resists all-encompassing accounts of changing capitalist work cultures, instead focusing on how the organisation and experience of work are shaped by particular and varying workplace geographies. The geographies of workplaces have been a recurrent but underexplored aspect of labour geographies (e.g. Castree 2007; Crang 1994; Henry & Massey 1995; Kanngieser 2013; McDowell 2009; McMorran 2012; Stein 1995). This session will foreground current scholarship in this area. The intention is for two ‘modules’ with four presentations in each. Potential foci for contributions include:
 
•  The theorisation of workplace geographies;
•  Workplaces as sites of discipline and / or biopower;
•  Workplaces as sites of pleasure and vitality;
•  Digital socio-materialities and the re-making of workplace geographies;
•  Workplace architectures and affective atmospheres;
•  Labour resistance and the politics of ‘anti-work’;
•  Gendered geographies of the workplace;
•  Creative methods for researching working life.
 
Please submit abstracts of up to 250 words to Philip Crang, via email at p.crang@rhul.ac.uk, by 7 February 2017. We will endeavour to contact all abstract authors with a response by 13 February.
 
Convenors:
 
Adam Badger, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway University of London. Email: adam.badger.2012@live.rhul.ac.uk
Philip Crang, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway University of London. Email: p.crang@rhul.ac.uk (corresponding convenor)
Katy Lawn, Department of Geography, Royal Holloway University of London. Email: katy.lawn.2015@live.rhul.ac.uk
 

CFP: Networks of Knowledge: Communicating Geographical Knowledge in the Long Nineteenth Century

Call for Papers
RGS-IBG Annual International Conference, London, 29 August–1 September 2017.

Lecture Theatre

Networks of Knowledge: Communicating Geographical Knowledge in the Long Nineteenth Century

Sponsored by the Historical Geography Research Group

Convened by: Benjamin Newman, Royal Holloway, University of London & Royal Geographical Society (w. IBG) & Innes M. Keighren, Royal Holloway, University of London.

The long nineteenth century witnessed a spike in the production and dissemination of geographical knowledge—a consequence of imperialism and scientific exploration on the one hand, and of improvements in the technologies of print and visual illustration on the other. Whether in the guise of thrilling accounts of heroic “discovery”, or more mundane records of empirical observation, such geographical knowledge was communicated to growing popular and professional audiences through books, periodicals, illustrated lectures, and exhibitions. The development of geographical societies and disciplinary periodicals during this period facilitated the dissemination of knowledge through institutional networks.

In recent years, historical geographers and historians of science have been concerned with the role of institutional networks in the circulation and consumption of knowledge, and with how local circumstances influence the mobility and reception of ideas (Finnegan, 2016; Keighren, 2010; Ogborn, 2010; Rupke, 1999; Secord, 1999; Withers, 2010). It is in relation to such work that we invite historical geographers and allied scholars to present current research concerned with the dissemination of geographical and related knowledge. We welcome papers that consider, among other things, geography’s nineteenth- and twentieth-century print culture, its performed oral traditions, and the technological advancements that encouraged the spread of knowledge to domestic and international audiences, both lay and specialised. Papers dealing with the role of speech, print, image, and object are particularly welcome.

Please submit abstracts (250 words max) to Ben Newman (benjamin.newman.2010@live.rhul.ac.uk) and Innes Keighren (innes.keighren@rhul.ac.uk), along with a title and author details, by 10 February, 2017.

RHUL GEOGRAPHERS IN SAN FRANCISCO

The city of San Francisco. Birds eye view from the bay looking south-west. Library of Congress (G4364.S5A3 1878 .P3).

The city of San Francisco. Birds eye view from the bay looking south-west. Library of Congress (G4364.S5A3 1878 .P3).

The preliminary programme for the 2016 Annual Meeting of the American Association of Geographers has recently been published. The Department of Geography at Royal Holloway, University of London will be strongly represented by both staff and doctoral researchers (detailed below).


Felicity Butler

Abstract:

Valuing Unpaid Care Work in Community Fair Trade, Creating Resilient Households? A Case Study of The Body Shop Trading model with a Nicaraguan Sesame Cooperative

Sessions:

Producing Vulnerabilities 2: Gender and Cooperative Responses in Latin America — Presenter


Mike Duggan

Abstract:

The lived experiences of a digitalizing world: where sleek technologies come up against the harsh realities of our cultural geographies

Sessions:

Geographies of Media IV: Digital technologies, everyday geographies and experiencing space and place (1) — Chair, Organizer, Presenter
Geographies of Media V: Digital technologies, everyday geographies and experiencing space and place (2) — Chair, Organizer


David Gilbert

Abstract:

The creativities of everyday faith spaces and participatory research approaches

Sessions:

Creative Approaches to Researching Religion in the City 1: Embodied Practices and Narratives of Everyday Religion — Presenter
Creative Approaches to Researching Religion in the City 3: Negotiating Difference and Urban Space — Discussant


Harriet Hawkins

Abstract:

Making Earth Futures

Sessions:

Creative Approaches to Researching Religion in the City 2: Exploring Faith through Participatory Public-Engagement Art — Discussant
Editor Meet Critics: Harriet Hawkins and Elizabeth Straughan’s “Geographical Aesthetics” (2014, Ashgate) — Panelist
Editor meets critics: The Sonoran Desert: A Literary Field Guide — Chair, Organizer
Geographies of Making: Creative Practices and Agentic Materiality — Presenter
Global Art Worlds and a World of Cities 2 — Discussant


Natalie Hyacinth

Abstract:

SoundWorlds of the Sacred: Sense, Spirituality and Musical Performance

Sessions:

Creative Approaches to Researching Religion in the City 1: Embodied Practices and Narratives of Everyday Religion — Organizer, Presenter
Creative Approaches to Researching Religion in the City 2: Exploring Faith through Participatory Public-Engagement Art — Chair, Organizer
Creative Approaches to Researching Religion in the City 3: Negotiating Difference and Urban Space — Organizer


Rikke Jensen

Abstract:

The Social Military: networked spaces, military places

Sessions:

Geographies of Media XIV: Media, governmentality, and managing the ‘more than human’ environment (2) — Presenter


Anna Nikolaeva

Abstract:

Understanding Sociality and Agency of Mobile Publics: Expectations, Interventions and Possibilities

Sessions:

Making Sense of Heterogeneous and Unequal Geographies of Passengers II: Situated, Embodied and Active Aeromobile Passengerings — Presenter
Theorizing Mobility Transitions: Scales, Sites and Struggles — Chair, Organizer


Alasdair Pinkerton

Abstract:

The Social Military: networked spaces, military places (Co-Presenter)

Sessions:

Geographies of Media XIV: Media, governmentality, and managing the ‘more than human’ environment (2) — Co-Presenter


Katherine Stansfeld

Abstract:

Practising encounters: using visual ethnography to explore conviviality in super-diverse Finsbury Park, London

Sessions:

Contestations and negotiations over place in super-diverse neighborhoods 2: Everyday encounters with difference — Presenter


Pip Thornton

Abstract:

The Production of Context and the Digital Reconstruction of Language

Sessions:

Toward a Geographical Software Studies 2: Language and tools — Presenter
Toward a Geographical Software Studies: methods and theory — Panelist

RHUL Geography Department to host ‘Cornwall Connections’ Symposium

On 12th March 2016 the Institute of Cornish Studies, part of the University of Exeter, will be holding a symposium at Royal Holloway, University of London in association with the Geography Department of that historic institution. The aim of the day is to explore both historical and contemporary connections between Cornwall and London with papers exploring topics like migration and centre-periphery relations. We would welcome papers from a broad range of disciplines and presented in a conventional lecture format or in a film or poster presentation.

It is appropriate that the symposium is being held at Royal Holloway since Thomas Holloway, the founder of the institution, had connections to the West Cornwall town of Penzance. If successful the aim is to hold similar events in the future both in other areas of Britain and overseas.

If you are interested in giving a presentation please send an abstract of 150 words along with name, title and institutional affiliation to both

cornishstudies@exeter.ac.uk and ben.gilby.2014@live.rhul.ac.uk by 10th February.

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Regional Identity in Europe (or England!) at the RGS-IBG International Conference

A week ago, I chaired my first ever session at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) Annual International Conference, which this year was held at the University of Exeter.

As a part-time Masters student, the initial response within the Faculty of me applying to run a session was a mixture of “You’re Brave/I would never have done that as a MA student!”, and whilst, yes it has had a few fraught moments over the past seven months or so, I can only firmly recommend it to Royal Holloway’s new intake of Masters students.

My own particular research area of Cornish Culture & Identity can often seem a bit like ploughing a lone furrow, as I am diverging greatly from a lot of the excellent research going on in our own immediate community – however, by looking at my immediate context and connecting it to present events around Europe – in particular Scotland, Catalonia and Veneto – I was able to attract a wide and diverse range of speakers for my session entitled ‘The Contemporary Growth of Regional Identity in Europe’.

Unfortunately, as these things often turn out, as the day of the session drew closer, several of my overseas speakers contacted me to withdraw, which left the session without papers on the important situations regarding devolutionary or independence movements in the North of England and Veneto. Consequently, I drew on my links with the burgeoning Cornish academic community, and my session was transformed into an affirming range of papers which dealt with the contemporary sense of what Hechter (1999) termed as ‘Internal Colonialism’, which has gained greater impetus since April 2014 when Cornwall was designated with National Minority Status under the Council of Europe Framework Convention.

The other major consideration with the RGS-IBG International Conference is its sheer scale – it is a conference attended by over 1,400 delegates from all around the world, and around 25 sessions run at the same time, hence you are competing strongly for an audience – unlike on previous occasions when I had made presentations on my research elsewhere where there was only ever one auditorium! I was absolutely delighted that the session drew a large audience of students and academics from all four corners of the globe, and it was exciting to see that Cornish Culture & Identity, plus the inherent sense of ‘difference’ between Cornwall and England was receiving such high profile attention.

Aspiration for One and All? Andrew Climo from the University of Oxford spoke about Cornwall’s historic devolution demands; summarising the fact that up to the late 1990s, calls for Cornish devolution were inchoate, but in 2002, the Cornish Constitutional Convention published its prospectus called Devolution for One and All, which acted as a nexus for the various competing views on future governance. His paper discussed what such a document might look like and how public engagement might be developed.

Julie Tamblin of ‘Learn Cornish in Cornwall’ then presented a historical overview on the three linguistic forms which characterize Cornish culture – Kernowek, Cornu-English and English and made connections between voices from Cornwall and Cornish voices writing back from the diaspora, showing the global influence of Cornish culture.

Mike Tripp, who recently retired from the Institute of Cornish Studies at the University of Exeter presented a paper entitled ‘Where there were two Cornishmen, there was a “rastle”: Cornish Wrestling & Identity’. Dr. Tripp’s paper covered the development of the sport into a widespread ‘traditional’ activity, deeply rooted in the local culture and, prior to the birth of Rugby Union, was Cornwall’s most popular sport. When, in the second half of the nineteenth century the Cornish economy suffered a catastrophic collapse that precipitated large numbers of people to leave Cornwall to find work abroad, the Cornish stuck together in distinct ethnic communities sustaining a strong sense of identity which manifested in the Cornish dialect and wrestling in Australia, South Africa and New Zealand

Finally, and very timely given the recent publication of his outstanding new book, Will Coleman, a bard of the Gorsedh Kernow presented an exceptionally lively paper entitled ‘Plen an Gwari: places of Play, Inclusivity and Resistance’. In this work, Coleman examined how in many places and cultures throughout history, performance has been used to articulate and strengthen the aspirations of minorities and to represent narratives resistant to dominant cultures. Driven by the ‘powerhouse’ of Glasney College in Penryn, the Gwari Meur culture of medieval Cornwall flourished for several hundred years and reached profound levels of artistry in its drama and literature. Related forms also developed elsewhere across Europe but “Cornwall was to do it better, and more intensively, than anywhere else” (Kent, 2010). The Gwari Meur culture was “a vital part of that strategy of resistance [… to Anglicization]” (Spriggs, 2004). It was international in its outlook yet intensely parochial in celebrating its sense of place. It was rebellious, unorthodox, irreverent, profound and a lot of fun. As a cultural totem the plen an gwari is the perfect foundation for the territory of Cornwall as we rebuild our inclusive, forward-looking and celebratory sense of Cornish nationhood.

To some Cornwall may be a county which is quite nice to go to on holiday. Delegates from around the globe left this session with a new sense of the immense pride that the Cornish have in their land. Gaging from questions that were directed to myself and my presenters, renowned focus on this particular ‘peripheral’ appendage of South-West England is about to take place…

Ben Gilby, MA Cultural Geography (Research) Part-Time (2nd Year)

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‘Geography Flies’ Through Years of International History

By Benjamin Newman and Hannah Awcock

ICHG Name Tag and Programme

The International Conference of Historical Geographers took place from the 5th to the 10th of July at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) in Kensington (Photo: Ben Newman).

As the International Conference of Historical Geographers drew to a close, amidst bids from St Petersburg and Warsaw to host the next meeting of the conference, Innes Keighren took to twitter to write that it was:

This, of course, was true in every respect. Over the previous six days, historical geographers from around the globe had come together in a frenzy of papers, plenaries, field-trips, lunches, dinners and a general hum of enthusiasm for historical geography. There was more to celebrate than just a successful conference with ICHG observing its 40th anniversary, and it was on that subject that Alan Baker (University of Cambridge) was invited to give the first plenary talk of the conference on the opening Sunday inside The Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)’s Ondaatje Theatre. His plenary would serve both as a celebration of the evolution of the meeting of British and Canadian Historical Geographers in Kingston, Ontario 40 years previous, and also as a reminder of the barriers to participation in historical geography, both at the conference and in the Journal of Historical Geography. His talk and invited contributions from international scholars left much to muse over at the welcome drinks reception that followed.

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Professor Catherine Hall gave an excellent plenary about British slave-owners (Photo: Hannah Awcock)

Monday would see the conference officially begin with eleven parallel sessions offering a feast of historical geography for delegates to enjoy. It would be difficult to summarise the diversity of the contributions, from urban historical geography, feminist historical geography, and GIS, to historical geography of extreme weather, war, knowledge, instruments, books, architecture, photography and many more. As the full first day of the conference drew to a close delegates excitedly gathered in the Ondaatje Theatre to listen to the first of three evening plenary sessions. UCL-based Professor Catherine Hall spoke to the title: Rethinking Slavery and Freedom. Professor Hall took a novel approach to slavery, focusing on the slave-owners rather than the slaves themselves. Thinking about how slave-owners constructed their world and justified their ownership of human beings allows us to put slavery back into British history.

Tuesday would be another busy day of all things historical geography, with Landscape Surgery’s first speaker, David Rooney. He got the Surgeons off to a good start with a paper on ‘Technologies of Segregation on the Streets of East London.’ He would be the first of a large number of Surgeons who participated in the conference, with Liz Haines, Noeme Santana, Hannah Awcock, Bergit Arends, Bethan Bide, Janet Owen, Innes M. Keighren, and Veronica della Dora, all involved in either convening, speaking, or both. And of course our own Felix Driver was Chair of the local organizing committee! Tuesday’s plenary was a landmark session with Felix chairing the inaugural British Academy Lecture in Geography, welcoming Bill Cronon (University of Wisconsin-Madison) to talk under the provocative title: Who reads Geography or History Anymore? The Challenges of Audience in a Digital Age. His talk discussed the death of the book length monograph, reading practices in the digital age and challenged the academy to consider the potential of various non-traditional outputs.

The RGS-IBG provided a perfect backdrop for lunch in the sunshine (Photo: Sophie Brockmann).

The RGS-IBG provided a perfect backdrop for lunch in the sunshine (Photo: Sophie Brockmann).

Conference delegates may have embraced Bill Cronon’s calls for academics to engage with social media a little too enthusiastically with the appearance of the @Geographyfly twitter account. The tweets were supposedly by a fly who liked to participate in proceedings by crawling around on the projector in the Ondaatje Theatre during plenary sessions. There was a certain amount of ‘buzz’ about who the genuine culprit was.

On Wednesday there was a break from formal sessions for a series of field trips. A series of 17 trips, ranging from the historical geography of hop picking in Kent to a musical tour of Soho, proved that historical geographers do far more than just sitting in the archive. Surgeon Innes Keighren was one of the organisers of a trip to Maritime Greenwich. We both thoroughly enjoyed our field trips, and the general consensus was they were all well organised and informative.

The field trip to the site of the 1862 Great Exhibition also included a tour of the Albert memorial in Hyde Park (Photo: Ruth Mason).

The field trip to the site of the 1862 Great Exhibition also included a tour of the Albert memorial in Hyde Park (Photo: Ruth Mason).

Thursday’s tube strike—minus some sore feet from walks across London—did little to dampen the atmosphere as parallel sessions kicked off again after Wednesday’s hiatus. That evening the final plenary of the conference was given by Professor Simon Schaffer (University of Cambridge), on the topic of ‘Astronomy at the Imperial Meridian: The Colonial Production of Hybrid Spaces.’ It is of note that none of the plenary speakers (apart from Alan Baker) identify as historical geographers, which reflects the truly interdisciplinary nature of the subject. In the opening plenary on Sunday evening Professor Mona Domosh (Dartmouth College) had suggested that maybe it doesn’t matter so much whether scholars call themselves historical geographers. Rather, what matters more is that people are doing historical geography in new and interesting ways, and after attending the ICHG it would be very hard to argue that it is anything less than a vibrant and dynamic discipline.

Historical geographers work hard, and they play hard! (Photo: James Kneale).

Historical geographers work hard, and they play hard! (Photo: James Kneale).

On Friday morning the finish line of this six-day marathon was in sight, but sessions continued unabated. The conference drew to a close with delegates choosing the hosts of the next ICHG. We would personally like to thank the Local Organising Committee and the RGS-IBG for doing such an excellent job of organizing and running the conference, and then all that remains is to say see you in Warsaw in 2018!

by Benjamin Newman and Hannah Awcock.

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RHUL Geographers at the ICHG

 

From 5 to 10 July, London will be host to the 16th International Conference of Historical Geographers. A number of Royal Holloway geographers have been involved in the organisation of the conference, not least Felix Driver, Chair of the Local Organising Committee.  Veronica della Dora and Innes M. Keighren have, additionally, served on the Conference Advisory Group.

Ten geographers from the department—a combination of doctoral students, staff, and Honorary Research Associates—will present papers across a range of different sessions (and take a lead in two of the mid-conference study visits).

Role Session Paper
Arends Bergit Chair Field experiments: collaborative practices in art and environment (2)
Arends Bergit Convenor Field experiments: collaborative practices in art and environment (2)
Arends Bergit Chair Field experiments: collaborative practices in art and environment (1)
Arends Bergit Convenor Field experiments: collaborative practices in art and environment (1)
Awcock Hannah Author Contesting the capital: Historical geographies of protest in London London calling: The Capital as a focus of protest and dissent
Awcock Hannah Convenor Contesting the capital: Historical geographies of protest in London
Bide Bethan Author Materiality and historical geography (1) Unravelling the Fabric of the City: Using Worn Clothing to Narrate London Lives
della Dora Veronica Author Topographies of piety: maps, texts, icons and pilgrimage (2) Topographies of Piety and Optics of Truth: Vasilij Grigorovich Barskij’s Pilgrimages to Mt Athos (1725-1745)
della Dora Veronica Chair Topographies of piety: Maps, texts, icons and pilgrimage (1)
della Dora Veronica Chair Geographies of religion
della Dora Veronica Convenor Topographies of piety: Maps, texts, icons and pilgrimage (1)
della Dora Veronica Convenor Topographies of piety: maps, texts, icons and pilgrimage (2)
Driver Felix Chair The material image: the photographic archive in circulation
Driver Felix Chair Welcome and introduction to the ICHG
Driver Felix Convenor The material image: the photographic archive in circulation
Driver Felix Convenor British Academy geography lecture: Who reads geography or history anymore? The challenge of audience in a digital age
Driver Felix Convenor Welcome and introduction to the ICHG
Driver Felix Chair Making and mobilising collections
Driver Felix Chair Geography and enlightenment
Driver Felix Convenor Business meeting and close of conference
Haines Liz Author Institutional geographies of the photograph: Aesthetics, circulation and affect (2) Pseudo-photogrammetry and the touristic imagination
Haines Liz Author Materiality and historical geography (2) When form becomes content: drawing historical narrative from the paper of paper records
Haines Liz Convenor Institutional geographies of the photograph: Aesthetics, circulation and affect (2)
Haines Liz Convenor Institutional geographies of the photograph: Aesthetics, circulation and affect (1)
Keighren Innes Author Mobility and empire (1) William Macintosh’s Travels: colonial mobility and the circulation of knowledge
Keighren Innes Chair Geographical knowledge and ignorance
Owen Janet Author Making and mobilising collections Fuegian Face-paints and Papuan Wood-carvings: Moments of collecting by Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace
Rooney David Author Architectures of hurry: Mobilities and modernity in urban environments (1) Technologies of Segregation on the Streets of East London
Santana Noeme Author Institutional geographies of the photograph: Aesthetics, circulation and affect (1) The S. Pearson & Son Malta Albums: institutional and corporate image(s)
Santana Noeme Author The material image: the photographic archive in circulation Materiality, corporate structure and global business: understanding and contextualising the Pearson photographic archive
Santana Noeme Convenor The material image: the photographic archive in circulation

 

RHUL GEOGRAPHERS IN EXETER

University of Exeter. Venue of the 2015 RGS-IBG Annual International Conference.

University of Exeter. Venue for the 2015 RGS-IBG Annual International Conference.

The Department of Geography will be well represented at this year’s RGS-IBG Annual International Conference in September. All told, 19 Royal Holloway geographers—MA students, PhD candidates, postdoctoral researchers, and members of staff—will be in attendance, presenting more than 20 papers in a diverse range of sessions (detailed below).

 

Session

Paper

Adey Peter Reimagining the mobility transition Thinking through the mobility transition
Adey Peter Reimagining the mobility transition
Adey Peter Surveilling Global Space
Arends Bergit Suspending the Anthropocene (1) Impasse, Lost Futures, Déjà vu Déjà-vu: the Anthropocene in the registers of contemporary artists
Boxall Katie Geographies of Amateur Creativities: Spaces, Practices and Experiences (1)
Boxall Katie Geographies of Amateur Creativities: Spaces, Practices and Experiences (1)
Boxall Katie Geographies of Amateur Creativities: Spaces, Practices and Experiences (2)
Cook Simon Current and emerging research in transport (1): Active travel and commuting Towards active travel beyond walking and cycling: the potential of run-commuting for transport geography
Cook Simon Geographies of Sport (1): Everyday sport Towards a geography of everyday sport: blurring boundaries, finding opportunities
Cook Simon Geographies of Sport (2): Everyday sport
Cook Simon Geographies of Sport (2): Everyday sport
Cook Simon Geographies of Sport (1): Everyday sport
Eades Gwilym Determinism, environment and geopolitics: an interdisciplinary conversation Roundtable Open Discussion
Eken Evren Knowledge, governmentality and power Governmentality, Geopolitics and Procedural Rhetoric in Video Games: A Practice Based Methodological Toolkit
Gilbert David The field formerly known as Urban Studies? (2) Rethinking the urban through its new manifestations Without the City? Suburbia’s central place in rethinking the urban
Gilbert David Geographies of Amateur Creativities: Spaces, Practices and Experiences (2) Making suburban faith: creativity and material culture in faith communities in West London
Gilby Ben The Contemporary Growth of Regional Identity in Europe (2): Regional Culture: Distinctiveness, Performance & Tradition
Gilby Ben The Contemporary Growth of Regional Identity in Europe (1): Trends In Devolution & Independence
Gilby Ben The Contemporary Growth of Regional Identity in Europe (1): Trends In Devolution & Independence
Harris Ella Producing Urban Life: Fragility and Socio-Cultural Infrastructures (3) Radical Infrastructures The Artworks: Maintaining Uncertain Urbanisms
Harris Ella Future Fossils? Specimens from the 5th millennium “Return to Earth” expedition (2): From slum fragments to shattered hard drives Container Architectures: Human Settlement Transformations in the Anthropocene
Harris Ella Urban Precarities (1): Precarity and urban imaginaries in declining, derelict and unregulated spaces
Harris Ella Urban Precarities (2): Precarity in Urban Places of Work and Residence: Experiences and Resistances
Hunt Mia Urban Precarities (2): Precarity in Urban Places of Work and Residence: Experiences and Resistances Politics and practice in the corner shop: The compound precarity of ad hoc retailing
Hunt Mia Attentive Geographies: materials, processes, creations (1) Knowing and Feeling: Practicing visual and material cultures in the corner shop
Hyacinth Natalie Geographies of Amateur Creativities: Spaces, Practices and Experiences (2) Making suburban faith: creativity and material culture in faith communities in West London
Kleine Dorothea Development’s pasts and futures: A critical dialogue between (Latin American) Area Studies and Geography, Panel Session Panel Discussion
Nikolaeva Anna Reimagining the mobility transition A “Quirky project” or an “Industry”? Challenges of imagining a mobility transition
Nikolaeva Anna Reimagining the mobility transition
Nowicki Mel Urban Precarities (1): Precarity and urban imaginaries in declining, derelict and unregulated spaces
Nowicki Mel Urban Precarities (2): Precarity in Urban Places of Work and Residence: Experiences and Resistances
Nowicki Mel Urban Precarities (2): Precarity in Urban Places of Work and Residence: Experiences and Resistances
Sheargold Robert The Contemporary Growth of Regional Identity in Europe (2): Regional Culture: Distinctiveness, Performance & Tradition
Sheargold Robert The Contemporary Growth of Regional Identity in Europe (2): Regional Culture: Distinctiveness, Performance & Tradition
Sheargold Robert The Contemporary Growth of Regional Identity in Europe (1): Trends In Devolution & Independence
Squire Rachael Wet Geographies III (2): Water-worlds – Wet Geographies Panel Discussion Wet Geographies III: Water-worlds – Wet Geographies Panel Discussion
Squire Rachael Wet Geographies I: Under the Sea: Geographies of the Deep
Squire Rachael Wet Geographies I: Under the Sea: Geographies of the Deep
Thornton Pip Algorithmic Practices: Emergent interoperability in the everyday (2) Language in the Age of Algorithmic Reproduction
Ward Miranda Geographies of Sport (1): Everyday sport Towards a geography of everyday sport: blurring boundaries, finding opportunities
Ward Miranda Geographies of Sport (2): Everyday sport
Ward Miranda Geographies of Sport (1): Everyday sport
Ward Miranda Geographies of Sport (1): Everyday sport
White Rosanna Wet Geographies I: Under the Sea: Geographies of the Deep Ceremonies of Possession: Performing sovereignty in the Canadian Arctic
Wood Astrid Reimagining the mobility transition Moving forward by looking backward: Reimagining the mobility transition in the UK
Wood Astrid Reimagining the mobility transition